To ban or not to ban….it’s not even a question.

The past several years has seen the approval of congress hit record lows. The extension of the incandescent bulb is a good reason why. Leaders should lead. Lighting consumes 38% of all of the US energy. Eliminating the worst polluter is simply the right thing to do. We desperately need a real energy policy; banning the incandescent bulb is the right thing to do. This isn’t about freedom of choice; if governing were about freedom, we’d all still be driving cars with 10 mpg, selling guns to babies and felons and have the freedom to paint toys with lead. Even the lamp manufacturers agree, they’ve pulled out of the US for production of these mini-ovens. This is simply a lack of leadership; and the irony is the bill was passed under Bush and the Republican congress over-rode it. We can save more oil by simply enacting real conservation policies than drilling. This is a sad day for lighting in general.

To ban or not to ban….it’s not even a question.

The past several years has seen the approval of congress hit record lows. The extension of the incandescent bulb is a good reason why. Leaders should lead. Lighting consumes 38% of all of the US energy. Eliminating the worst polluter is simply the right thing to do. We desperately need a real energy policy; banning the incandescent bulb is the right thing to do. This isn’t about freedom of choice; if governing were about freedom, we’d all still be driving cars with 10 mpg, selling guns to babies and felons and have the freedom to paint toys with lead. Even the lamp manufacturers agree, they’ve pulled out of the US for production of these mini-ovens. This is simply a lack of leadership; and the irony is the bill was passed under Bush and the Republican congress over-rode it. We can save more oil by simply enacting real conservation policies than drilling. This is a sad day for lighting in general.

Ever wonder?

At this time of year, it seems we take a collective deep breath and enjoy the holiday season. From newsletters to twitter feeds to blogs, everyone is putting a little Christmas spin on their everyday posts. We really enjoyed Enlightenment Magazine’s recent article (listed below) that explains a longstanding tradition. Ever wondered how those colorful Christmas lights got onto your tree? In 1880 Thomas Edison hung the first set of Christmas lights outside of his laboratory. The lights were a luxury item and only seen in stores and in the mansions of those who had enough money to run them. It wasn’t until two decades later the average American could afford Christmas lights and in 1903 General Electric began selling them. Some estimate that when the lights were first introduced, it cost about $2000 to light a tree due to the high price of electricity. This year’s White House Christmas tree is lit with General Electrics LED programmable lights. The Christmas tradition has stayed the same for decades, but today we have new technology for a brighter and more energy efficient Christmas experience!

From all of us at Egret, we wish you the Happiest of Holidays.

The History of Christmas Lights

Focusing on Manufacturing

The Obama administration announced that it has created a cabinet level Office of Manufacturing Policy position. They said that while over the past two administrations there have been a minimum of three manufacturing czars, those manufacturing policies have failed. The two chairs of the office are Commerce Secretary John Bryson and National Economic Council Director Gene Sperling.
 
Manufactured goods account for 57% of the nations exports and some argue that the US has long neglected the manufacturing industry. Automation does mean fewer jobs, however the goal of the new office  is to create jobs supporting these new smart factories that will provide a competitive edge against foreign countries to make the United States a top competitor in 21st century manufacturing.
 
What impact do you believe this focus on manufacturing policy will have on the electrical industry?

http://www.jsonline.com/business/obama-establishes-an-office-of-manufacturing-policy-rc3dhmr-135439343.html

Age is the word.

           Anyone who has spent time recruiting in the electrical industry knows that age is an interesting animal. Ted commented in our June newsletter:

 I’d hate to keep track of the number of times we get direct inquiries from clients who ask us to find someone who is ‘young’; even to the exact age band they want. First of all, it’s illegal, so give it up. Second, it’s impractical. Define what you want to accomplish, and if the new candidate can deliver the results you require, why would you demand they be 38 years old? So they can stay with the company? The average tenure of someone between 25-44 yrs of age is less than 4 years. Either accept the fact ‘young’ will leave in less than four years, or solve the real problem: define the results and hire to achieve those results irrespective of age, and save the federal labor investigation.

           Anne Fisher, of Fortune, gives her particular take on how to attack the job market if you’re over 50. What are your thoughts?

http://management.fortune.cnn.com/2011/12/09/getting-hired-when-youre-over-50/